Manufacturing firms in developing countries

how well do they do, and why? by James R. Tybout

Publisher: World Bank, Development Research Group, Trade in Washington, DC

Written in English
Published: Pages: 59 Downloads: 517
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Places:

  • Developing countries.

Subjects:

  • Manufacturing industries -- Developing countries.,
  • Industries -- Developing countries.,
  • Free trade -- Developing countries.,
  • Trade regulation -- Developing countries.,
  • Industrial policy -- Developing countries.

Edition Notes

StatementJames Tybout.
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 1965, Policy research working papers ;, 1965.
ContributionsWorld Bank. Development Research Group. Trade.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57 P63 no. 1965
The Physical Object
Pagination59 p. :
Number of Pages59
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL497448M
LC Control Number98231810

Large firms play a pivotal role in international trade. A significant share of exports is done by a small number of these large firms, which enjoy substantial market power across destination countries, as documented in Freund and Pierola (). 1 The fates of these large firms shape, in part, the countries’ trade patterns. For instance, Nokia in Finland or the Intel plant in Costa . During the _____ stage, firms market products in industrialized countries to consumers who can afford the high prices charged to recover the high investment costs. introduction For products in the _____________________ stage of the product lifecycle, profits are declining, and a firm might consider whether its presence in the market is warranted. The combination of trade and monetary problems emanating from Europe and the USA will put severe strain on Governments in developing countries which are already battling with soaring medical costs, pressing demands to provide emergency assistance to the poorest sections of the population, and assistance to bail out faltering firms.   Executive Summary. The shortages of critical medical supplies and everyday items that the U.S. is now experiencing during the pandemic is due to a fundamental shift to global manufacturing that.

Trade liberalization seems to have increased growth and income in developing countries over the past thirty years, through lower prices, firm-level efficiency gains and improved access to foreign inputs. However, aggregate gains from free trade are not necessarily equally distributed, so that trade liberalization has important costs for some people. The current economic crisis .   In the past two decades, there has been a dramatic shift by technology product companies to outsource manufacturing to low-cost countries (LCCs) like China, India, and Mexico. This follows a long history of outsourcing to LCCs by consumer product companies. digitalization in industrial firms in developing countries, with a view to understanding how achieve this goal, a comparative analysis is conducted based on surveys of 1, firms of varied sizes and manufacturing industries carried out between and in Brazil, Argentina. a faster growth of services than of manufacturing in many developing countries; the emergence of ‘de-industrialization’ in several developing countries, at low levels of per capita income; jobless growth in the formal sector, even in fast-growing countries such as India; and a large expansion of the informal sector in developing countries.

Promoting Balanced Competitiveness Strategies of Firms in Developing Countries: Since the pioneering work of Joseph Schumpeter (), it has been assumed that innovations typically play a key role in firms’ competitiveness. This assumption has been applied to firms in both developed and developing countries. However, the innovative capacities and business environments of firms . CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): The manufacturing sectors of less developed countries (LDCs) have traditionally been relatively protected. They have also been subject to heavy regulation, much of which is biased in favor of large enterprises. Accordingly, it is often argued that manufacturers in these countries . prove that the manufacturing sector is imbued with three important characteristics. First, for middle-income economies, manufacturing pulls along services, instead of the other way around. A decline in the manufacturing sector growth rate will negatively affect the growth rate of the services sector, in both the short-run and long-run meanings. Global foreign direct investment in developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America is projected to plunge by 25 percent to 50 percent in due .

Manufacturing firms in developing countries by James R. Tybout Download PDF EPUB FB2

The main focus of this book is innovation for developing countries: what is the innovation for, what are the current conditions of the innovation, and how to effectively innovate in developing economi Small and Medium Manufacturing Enterprises in Vietnam.

Trang Thi Thu Pham, Nobuaki Matsunaga. Pages Home > Policy Research Working Papers > Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries: How Well Do They Do, and Why. The notion of the “technology shelf” stocked in libraries and archives of universities and manufacturing firms of the developed world and just waiting to be used by any odd LDC was the standard idea with which economists approached the study of the industrialization process of developing nations.

Downloadable (with restrictions). Author(s): James R. Tybout. Abstract: The manufacturing sectors of developing countries have traditionally been relatively protected. They have also been subject to heavy regulation, much of which has favored large firms. Accordingly, it is often argued that in these countries: (1) markets tolerate inefficient firms, so cross-firm.

developing countries. Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa stand out among the devel-5 The wages of scientists and engineers in manufacturing firms constitute percent of GDP in the most technologically primitive of the developing countries, while the account for percent of GDP in the OECD (Evenson and Westphal,table ).

In this volume, Vivienne Wang and Elias G. Carayannis apply both theoretical approaches and empirical analysis to explore the dynamics of innovation in developing countries, with a particular emphasis on R&D in manufacturing firms. Investigates the constraints on African manufacturing firm growth, using the World Bank Enterprise Surveys (–10) firms across 98 countries, in order to identify the most findings have several implications for developing countries: (1) because the constraints differ across countries and, within countries, across sectors, policies need to be.

Manufacturing has traditionally played a key role in the economic development of developing countries. In recent years, it has been argued that the importance of Manufacturing firms in developing countries book has diminished over the last 20–25 years, resulting in premature deindustrialization or non-industrialization in developing countries.

We first found that of all goods imported by US manufacturing firms (not wholesaler or retailers), the share produced in low-wage countries rose from 7% in to 23% in At the same time, toxic air emissions from manufacturing. numbers of jobs. Countries such as Bangladesh, China, Malaysia and Viet Nam have developed light manufacturing – by building textiles and garment industries – to kick-start industrialisation.

Many African countries have a desire to industrialise, as witnessed in. Tybout: Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries Brazil, China, India, and Indonesia, the size of the domestic market for manu-factured products is relatively limited (Figure 1). Further, among the least de-veloped countries, Engel effects favor basic subsistence needs over all but.

It also analyzes the challenges faced in the manufacturing firms in developing countries. The methodology followed a thorough review of literature and semistructured interviews amongst the. The Economy; Competitiveness; Top 10 Manufacturing Countries in “Manufacturing competitiveness, increasingly propelled by advanced technologies, is converging the digital and physical worlds, within and beyond the factory to both customers and suppliers, creating a highly responsive, innovative, and competitive global manufacturing landscape,” says Craig Giffi, a.

Developing countries’ traditional path to development, often driven by manufacturing, may be at risk because the criteria for becoming an attractive production location are changing. Although there are challenges, opportunities remain for developing countries, as long as governments take appropriate policy actions on the 3Cs: competitiveness.

Get this from a library. Production management for small- and medium-scale furniture manufacturing firms in developing countries. [Eduardo Q Canela; United Nations Industrial Development Organization.].

Promoting Balanced Competitiveness Strategies of Firms in Developing Countries (Innovation, Technology, and Knowledge Management Book 12) - Kindle edition by Wang, Vivienne W L, Carayannis, Elias G.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Manufacturer: Springer.

The manufacturing sectors of developing countries have traditionally been relatively protected. They have also been subject to heavy regulation, much of which has favored large firms.

MANUFACTURING FIRMS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: HOW WELL DO THEY DO, AND WHY. James Tybout. Development and Comp Systems from University Library of Munich, Germany. Abstract: The manufacturing sectors of less developed countries (LDCs) have traditionally been relatively protected.

They have also been subject to heavy regulation, much. The day you grow rich the first change that can be seen is in your styling sense. Especially in developing countries, wearing good cloths is often seen as rise in standard and wealth. Most developing countries have seen the growth of international brands as those who have earned good sums have spent their money in buying good cloths.

Downloadable. Prioritizing the growth of particular sectors or regions is often part of LDC growth strategies.

We study a prototypical example of such policies in Ethiopia, exploiting geographic and sectoral variation in the form and scale of the policy for identification. Using product-level data on Ethiopian manufacturing firms we show that the policy was unsuccessful: There was no.

Capital structures in developing countries: evidence from ten countries (English) Abstract. The authors investigate capital structures in a sample of the largest publicly traded firms in ten developing countries - Brazil, India, Jordan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Thailand, Turkey, and Zimbabwe - for - Additional Physical Format: Online version: Tybout, James R., Manufacturing firms in developing countries.

Washington, DC: World Bank, Development Research. The success of public health initiatives in developing countries often hinges on the same two pressure points: market access and product affordability.

Find. 50 Best Small Business ideas for Developing Countries in 1. Garbage and waste collection: pollution and waste disposal problems have always been one of the many problems that a lot of developing countries have in common.

By developing a solution to effectively dispose these garbage and waste, entrepreneurs can make a lot of money. Multinational companies like Nike, Sony, Apple, Toyota, Coca-Cola all have investments and operations in developing economies.

This can lead to both benefits and disadvantages for developing economies. Advantages of Multinational Corporations in developing countries. Multinationals provide an inflow of capital into the developing country.

Researchers say this is highlighted by the rise of manufacturing in developing countries such as Brazil and India, as well as regions such as Eastern Europe and South East Asia, as firms look.

9 The wages of scientists and engineers in manufacturing firms constitute percent of GDP in the most techn o-logically primitive of the developing countries, while they account for percent of GDP in the OECD (Evenson and Westphal,table ).

A logarithmic regression of the secondary school enrollment rate on GDP per. We first found that of all goods imported by U.S. manufacturing firms (not wholesaler or retailers), the share produced in low-wage countries rose from 7 percent in to 23 percent in   Firm switchers are likely to be unique, differing from both newly established entrants and exiting firms that are closing down operations.

In this study, we develop an empirical model that examines switching behavior using data from Vietnamese manufacturing firms during the – period. Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries: How Well Do They Do, and Why.

by James R. Tybout. Published in vol issue 1, pages of Journal of Economic Literature, MarchAbstract: The manufacturing sectors of developing countries have traditionally been relatively protected.

They ha. Explore new international economic and business trends and how your firm can benefit from them! Internationalization of Companies from Developing Countries provides marketing and economic researchers and students with both theoretical and empirical insights into the motives, methods, and processes of internationalization of firms in the developing countries.

– The purpose of this paper is to formulate the manufacturing strategy in a developing country with particular reference to Nigeria in sub-Saharan African country., – Using survey methodology and the partial least squares – structural equation modeling technique, The authors find that in addition to the four basic environmental factors – business cost, labor .In Mexico, for example, firms with more than 80 percent of all sales devoted to exports paid wages at least 58 percent higher than non-exporting firms.

And, a study found that foreign-owned plants in Indonesia paid 33 percent more for blue-collar workers and 70 percent more for white-collar workers than locally owned firms.